Roxy Hempel: 5 Ways to be More Eco Conscious…

5 ways to be more eco conscious…

The very inspiring Roxy Hempel from the Eco Edit tells us 5 ways to be more eco conscious. The Eco Edit is a lifestyle platform for the eco conscious, exploring brands that have a positive impact. This includes eco and socially conscious fashion brands, green beauty products and philanthropic lifestyle brands.

 

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Roxy Hempel

 

1. Give up or cut down on animal products

Cutting down or avoiding meat altogether is the most effective way you can be more eco conscious, and the great news is, it has an immediate impact!
Following a plant based diet is healthy, budget friendly, and limitless – all of your favourite meals can be veganised, its easy once you know how!

If you are giving it a go there are lots of resources available online, try the #veganuary hashtag on Instagram, of search for your local vegan group on Facebook for support and tips on eating near you.

Still not sure sure of the reasons why? The movie, Cowspiracy is a good place to start, or Earthlings and Forks over knives.

 

2. Plant trees for free everytime you use the internet.

Ecosia is a free browser and app you can download for your computer and devices, that plants trees on your behalf every time you use it. So far this initiative has planted over 18 million trees in developing and rural communities! It is completely free for you and works just the same as your current browser (Google, safari, etc). You can find out more and get the links to download the browser for your computer and the app by visiting the website.

 

3. Choose sustainable fashion brands

Fashion is a hugely polluting industry. From the textile production to the dyeing process, to the overwhelming amount of wastage, there are huge enviromental issues which we don’t even know the full extent of yet. The good news is there are tons of great sustainable fashion brand out there that do things differently. Brands that use eco friendly fibers and dyes, recycled textiles and support fair trade principles. Follow me over on Instagram, and sign up to the newsletter of my lifestyle platform Eco Edit, and receive weekly edits of the best sustainable fashion brands.

 

4. Say not to plastic

There is no doubt about it, our plastic consumption is out of a control and is having a devastating effect on the enviroment. There is more than 8 BILLION tons of plastic on this planet, and the majority of that is waste that will take around 450 years to decompose. If laid out flat, 10 inches deep, it would be enough to cover the whole of Argentina, the 8th largest country in the world. Join our Facebook group ‘Less plastic is fantastic’ which we update with tips and ideas for reducing single use plastic consumption.

An easy one you can utilise right away – when choosing drinks, if you’re not using your own reusable cup, opt for aluminium or glass – either of these can be recycled an infinite number of times without losing their quality, unlike plastic which can only be recycled once.

 

5. Go green on your energy source

Check out Bulb – they offer 100% renewable energy, they pay your exit fees from your current energy supplier AND they save you on average 20% on your energy bills a year, they will also switch everything over for you, making it completely hassle free!
Saving the planet and saving money – what’s not to like?!

For more ideas on how to be more eco conscious, see a blog post 10 practical and positive things you can do, here http://www.theecoedit.co.uk/10-practical-positive-things-can-make-world-better-place/

You can find me either at Eco Edit http://www.theecoedit.co.uk or over on instagram here https://www.instagram.com/_theecoedit/

Meet Our Mascot Bob!

Bob

Our Portlebay team is a small and passionate group of individuals that adore popcorn and all things to do with the beach, outdoors and anything that will make us giggle! This is certainly accurate for our most jolly team member, Bob, our mighty mascot!

If you haven’t yet had the pleasure of meeting this cheeky chap, then say ‘hello’ to Bob the seagull! Along with his knobbly knees and beak full of popcorn, you may notice his very stylish American themed sailor hat. This quirky little addition represents the dawn of Portlebay Popcorn, when our wonderful Chief Pop-Meisters went on a great adventure to America and found their inspiration to start hand-popping delicious popcorn in Sunny little Devon.

Bob’s Fact File:

Name: Bob

Birthday: 12th March

Birth place: Born and bred in Sunny Cove, East Portlemouth

Height: Average seagull size

Favourite Colour: Navy blue and even better if it’s striped!

Favourite Activities: Bobbing on the sea waves,  sneaking popcorn from The Poppery and chasing all the gulls!

Favourite Popcorn Flavour: Lightly Sea Salted

Most Annoying Habit: Distracting and playing tricks on the Portlebay team (ALL THE TIME!)

 

Look out for Bob on our social media channels, he can be quite a cheeky bird but does love all the attention he can get!

 

 

 

 

 

Oh No, No Palm Oil Here

Our small Portlebay team are proud of our all natural popcorn that we hand pop ourselves. Our range has been carefully crafted to reduce any allergens, to cater for those that are vegetarian and vegan, and to offer a healthier snack alternative to crisps and other popular snacks. Along our quest to create tasty treats, we also endeavour to be conscious and thoughtful with our actions, in order to conserve and safeguard our beautiful home and those that inhabit it. For these reasons palm oil is a big no no and we strongly dislike the stuff!

What is Palm Oil?

Palm oil is type of vegetable oil, that is traded globally and is present in many of the products we see on the supermarket shelves. The oil is derived from the palm fruit, which grows on the African Oil Palm Tree. Today palm oil is grown throughout Africa, Asia, North America, and South America. Currently, the majority of palm oil is produced and exported from Indonesia and Malaysia. As noted by the activist group of Say No To Palm Oil, the demand for the oil has very rapidly increased in recent decades, as it has been made widely available, is inexspensive (due to small production costs) and is a diverse product with regards to its uses. The group also highlighted, that the oil is found in a huge amount of household products including baked goods, confectionery, shampoo, cosmetics, cleaning products, washing detergents and toothpaste, leaving the average Western citizen consuming more than 10kg of palm oil annually.

What are the issues with palm oil? 

The environment

A great proportion of palm oil development occurs at the expense of the environments in which the palm oil is sourced. As identified by the WWF, palm oil plantations have a number of environmental impacts including:

  • large scale forest conversion
  • soil erosion
  •  air pollution
  • soil and water pollution
  • climate change

The most significant issue of these is the large scale forest conversion. In Indonesia and Malaysia there is a direct relationship between the growth of palm oil plantations and deforestation. In 2007 the United Nations Environment Programme published a report which professes that oil palm plantations are the leading cause of rainforest devastation in the two countries. The extensive forest devastation of palm oil plantations is resulting in calamitous effects for a large number of plant and animal species.

The Animals 

Palm Oil Investigations, a non profit organisation which focuses on educating and raising awareness about the hazards of palm oil, passionately talk about the species which are edging towards extinction, as a result of the habitat destruction that is taking place during the production of palm oil.

Orangutan 

Both the Bornean and Sumatran orangutans are critically endangered due to palm oil plantations. Orangutans create nests to sleep in during the night, and reside in smaller nests during the day time. In order to survive orangutans need trees and forestry, however the higher the demand for palm oil the less forestry there is for the orangutan.

The Bornean orangutan is a Borneo native, which today is a protected specie, with specific ares of Borneo specially protected, however it has become apparent that a large majority of these orangutans currently

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Sumatran Orangutan 

are living outside of these protected areas. The distribution of the Bornean organutan is extremely patchy throughout the island, with fewer than an estimated 60,000 left in the wild. This figure is significantly declining, with the rapid expansion of palm oil plantations in Borneo, as the lack of forestry leaves the orangutans vulnerable to poachers. The demolition of forestry is forcing the orangutan populations to shrink and making the creatures more prone to genetic drift and inbreeding.

The Sumatran Orangutan are being threatened by both illegal and legal logging, the conversion of forest land to agricultural land and palm oil plantations. Sumatran orangutans are currently forecasted to be one of the first Great Apes to become extinct, with there being less than 6,000 remaining in the wild.

Sumatran Elephant

 The Sumatran elephant is native to the Indonesia island of Sumatra and are smaller than African elephants. These elephants are being threaten by habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation, and poaching. Subsequently, there less than 2,500 Sumatran elephants remaining in the wild. In the last 25 years 69% of potential elephant habitat has been lost, leaving much of the remaining forest in limited sections which are too small for elephant populations to live in.

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Sumatran Elephant

Due to habitat loss and a lack of food, elephants are frequently being poisoned as they are forced to stray into plantations and villages which have strategies to prevent elephants impeding on the areas. This conflict between humans and elephants is becoming more frequent as habitats are cleared for palm oil, putting the Sumatran elephants at even more risk.

 

Sumatran Tiger

Sumatran tigers are the smallest of all tigers and have more of beard and mane than most. The Sumatran tiger resides in the forest of the Sumatran Island where they are fighting for survival.

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Sumatran Tiger

Currently there are approximately 300 Sumatran tigers existing in the wild. With the acceleration of deforestation for palm oil and poaching, the tigers could in time be extinct. The deforestation is not only depriving the tigers of a habitat but also of food. With both poaching and deforestation showing no sign of slowing the tigers are increasingly at threat.
Other Animals

There are even more animals which are being threatened by the palm oil plantations, including:

  • Sunda Clouded Leopard
  • Sumatran Rhinoceros
  • Sunda Pangolin

  • Crested Black Macaque
  • Malayan Tapir.

None of these creatures should be disregarded and certainly not pushed to extinction as a consequent of our own actions.

The People

Survival, a global group devoted to fighting for tribal people’s rights, passionately notes that many indigenous tribes are under great threat from palm oil plantations. One woman from the Penan tribe  (a group of hunter-gathers) from Malaysia told Survival, ‘The forest is my roof and my shelter and the forest is also where I can find food to eat. But when the oil palm comes in, everything will be gone.’

Although palm oil plantations frequently promote bringing development to rural areas and providing employment for some locals, the impact of the plantations have also had devastating effects on locals living around the affected areas.

As the plantations are destroying the rainforest, the local people are having no other choice but to work for and depend on the income from the plantations. These working conditions are of a poor standard and many of the workers do not earn enough to support their families. Furthering this, child labour has also become an issue in some areas, with children suffering from heat exhaustion and gaining injuries from climbing thorny oil palms.

Although it has been evident that indigenous people have in some cases benefited from the palm oil industry in Indonesia, these situations are particularly rare. Palm oil has on frequent occasions had a long lasting negative effects, which has subsequently altered the lifestyle of many. More often than not indigenous people have become subject to cruel and greedy palm oil labour, with little choice in the matter.

Is palm oil bad for your health too? 

A Common Ingredient

As mentioned by the organisation Live Strong, which provides expert information on all topics that contribute towards a healthy lifestyle, palm oil is less expensive than many other oils and can be utilised to extend the shelf life of processed foods, as a result of this it is often found in our supermarkets and often a substance that we consume.

The organisation further this stating that palm oil in an oxidised state can be a danger to our physiological and biochemical functions. Manufacturers of processed goods do often oxidise palm oil found in these products for culinary reasons, which consequently means a great deal of the palm oil consumed by shoppers is in this oxidised state. The threats of oxidized palm oil include organotoxicity of the heart, kidney, liver and lungs and reproductive toxicity. Not nice.

Saturated Fat

Erica Kannall, a registered dietitian and certified health/fitness specialist, emphasised that palm oil is notably high in saturated fat. Diets which are high in this saturated fat can contribute to high levels of cholesterol and also a build up of plaque in the arteries. If the consumption of saturated fat is continued for a long duration it could lead to a heart attack or stroke. The NHS recommend that the average man should not eat any more than 30g of saturated fat per day and no more than 20g of saturated fat per day for the average woman. One tablespoon of palm oil contains 7g of saturated fat. This means, a person consuming products containing palm oil could easily reach their recommended limit, without even considering products with no palm oil but still high in saturated fat.

What do we use instead of Palm Oil then? 

During the process of hand popping our delicious popcorn we use rapeseed oil instead of palm oil. Our rapeseed oil is both grown and produced in the UK and so doesn’t travel far before arriving at our little Poppery! At all stages of the rapeseed oil creation process no people or animals are threatened or harmed.

Rapeseed oil is also low in saturated fat and so is far less likely to cause a build up of plaque in the arteries. Not only is rapeseed oil

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Rapeseed Oil

low in saturated fat but, as stated by BBC Good Food, it has been acknowledge for having a range of health and nutritional benefits. This includes the oil containing omega 3, 6 and 9, which helps to reduce cholesterol and also maintain healthy joints, brain and heart functions.

We believe that our popcorn should be created with the best natural ingredients, that can be enjoyed and consumed without contributing to any health issues. We also aim to be conscious and thoughtful with our decisions throughout the popcorn process, as we live in a beautiful world, with many beautiful creatures which we would hate to harm or deprive in any way.

References:

https://www.livestrong.com/article/198975-what-are-the-dangers-of-palm-oil/

http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/Whats_the_issue.php

http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/footprint/agriculture/about_palm_oil/environmental_impacts/

https://www.unenvironment.org

https://www.palmoilinvestigations.org

https://www.survivalinternational.org/news/6787

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/palm-oil-health-hazards-7375.html

https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/Eat-less-saturated-fat.aspx

http://silbury.co.uk/our-products/oils-fats

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/glossary/rapeseed-oil

Save our Hedgehogs!

If you’re anything like us, you just LIVE for this time of year. Crisp Autumn nights are made nice and cosy with hot chocolate, sticky toffee puddings and of course a bloomin’ big bonfire that lights up the sky and warms you down to your little cotton socks.

But we’re not the only ones who love to kick up some leaves this time of year – hedgehogs come in a very close second! Right about now, they’re gorging on slugs, spiders and other creepy crawlies so they can have a nice, long snooze. Or in science-y speak, they’re about to hibernate. Unfortunately, us humans have made it pretty tricky for these balls of prickles to find the perfect bed for themselves, or do very much at all!

Right now, there are just under a million in the wild; that may sound a lot, but in the 1950’s there were 30 million of these critters running around. 30 million! There isn’t one specific cause, but loss of habitat, increased farming, busier roads and a rise in the number of badgers definitely doesn’t help.

So what can we do to help our spiky little friends? We went to Prickly Ball Farm, a farm dedicated to caring for injured or sick hedgehogs, to find out!

Build Your Bonfires Last Minute

The one time being prepared is a bad idea! Stacking all your burnable items right before you set it alight will unsure an unsuspecting hedgehog hasn’t had time to make a nice little nest in amongst the bonfire! If you really MUST be organised, make sure you give the ground underneath a gentle poke to wake them up in time!

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Keep Your Garden a Little Bit Messy

A hooray for lazy gardeners everywhere! The advice from wildlife experts is to look at your garden as a mini nature reserve – twigs, leaves and bushes are a hedgehog’s paradise. Or, if you want to give your little garden lodgers the V.I.H experience, you can make up you own hedgehog house to make sure they are completely undisturbed!

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A hedgehog oasis

Have Holes in Your Fences 

This may sound like we just want you to have a really shabby garden, but these little Tom & Jerry style holes will make sure a hedgehog can take refuge in your lovely garden! Hedgehogs travel 1-2 miles a night searching for food, shelter and mates, so the easier they can get around, the more likely they’re to survive.

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A hedgehog nightmare!

If You Find a Hedgehog…

Rejoice! You’re one of the lucky ones to have spotted one this year! It may be peckish, so offer it cat/dog meat or cat/dog biscuits, or you could also use bird seed, sunflower hearts, meal worms, unsalted peanuts, raisins and dried fruit, and only offer it water to drink!

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Donate to Your Local Hedgehog Hospital 

There’s no such thing as an NHS or private healthcare for hedgehogs unfortunately, so donating to places like Prickly Ball Farm ensure they can get the care they need if they do become ill, or lose their homes and habitat! Olbas oil for sniffly hedgehog noses, newspapers, cat food and blankets are all greatly appreciated at hedgehog hospitals up and down the country. If you do want to make a donation, you can find their info here!

We would just like to say a massive thank you to Prickly Ball Farm for letting come to visit, and in particular Danielle who is a hedgehog genius and answered all of our many  questions! The hedgehogs are lucky to have you!

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The lovely Danielle and adorable Gary